ResearchSOC helps make scientific computing resilient to cyberattacks and capable of supporting trustworthy, productive research.

We fit in where others do not

The Research Security Operations Center (ResearchSOC) is a new collaborative security response center that addresses the unique cybersecurity concerns of the research and education (R&E) community. The R&E community is large, highly collaborative, uses diverse infrastructure, and enjoys a fair degree of autonomy. This leaves a lot of potential security holes to fill.

ResearchSOC helps make scientific computing resilient to cyberattacks and capable of supporting trustworthy, productive research. We do this by providing the cybersecurity services, training, and information sharing necessary to a community as unique and variable as R&E.

We tailor these services to the needs of the R&E community, and we have established a community of practice for sharing expertise and operational intelligence.

Leveraging resources from all over the country

ResearchSOC brings together existing cybersecurity services from Indiana University, Duke University, the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center, and the University of California San Diego. These services have existing infrastructure and customer bases, which ResearchSOC can leverage to more effectively and sustainably guard against cybersecurity threats. We tailor these services to the needs of the R&E community, and we have established a community of practice for sharing expertise and operational intelligence.

OmniSOC

With two decades of experience from the GlobalNOC behind it, OmniSOC is a security operations center that provides trusted and actionable intelligence to higher education institutions. GlobalNOC is based at Indiana University.

Vulnerability Identification Service at the Three Rivers Optical Exchange (3ROX)

This service leverages the widely deployed open-source ‘OpenVAS’ framework to identify assets in need of protection. 3ROX is operated and managed by the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center.

Sharing Threat Intelligence for Network Gatekeeping with Automated Response (STINGAR)

Duke University developed STINGAR, which uses a decoy computer system for trapping or tracking hackers (known as a honeypot). STINGAR uses automation to speed responses.

Cybersecurity Best Practices for Research

The University of California San Diego will provide training and best practices for information security professionals on addressing the technical and cultural challenges in securing research in higher education.

Need our help?

The ResearchSOC offers outreach and training to educate research project teams and the higher education community about information security. We’re always working with the larger cybersecurity research community, of which we are a part, to improve information security. 

Return to this site for more details as the center begins operations, and feel free to contact us to learn more. 

Outreach and Training

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